Kathy Lambert had the pleasure of speaking with Daniel Aaron on The Art of Living Vibrant Show! She was able to share the transformative power of finding your purpose and living it, not just for herself but for others as well. It’s truly amazing the lives you can touch and the impact you can create around you when you do 💕

We invite you to listen to our conversation below 🎧

Special Guest Expert - Kathy Lambert: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Expert - Kathy Lambert: this mp4 video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Daniel Aaron:
What does it take to create a vibrant, thriving life? First, the sad news is that Thoreau was right most people are leading quiet lives of desperation, lacking in meaning, fulfillment, and vitality. But we choose more. We choose to create extraordinary lives and the art of vibrant living. Show entertains you with inspiration, empowerment and education to create your life into a masterpiece. It's time. Let's vibe up. Aloha, y'all. Daniel Aaron here, your host for the Art of Vibrant Living show. And yes, we are about to vibe up. Does that make sense? Right. Everything is frequency. Everything is vibration. This is not woo woo stuff anymore. Everybody knows that. It's scientifically documented and feeling better, doing more in your life, having more of you want what you want is in many ways just a process of vibration going up. So we are vibing up. We've got an amazing show today. You are going to be blown away in love, my guest. I'll tell you about her in a moment. First though, this show, what's the point? The point is to empower you, to help you to live a thriving, vibrant, amazing life. And when I say make your life a masterpiece, I don't mean that in a hyperbolic way. I mean literally like when Gandhi was asked, what's your message to the world? And he said, my life is my message. Your life is just as important. And the message that you create through living your truest life is hugely valuable. And if you don't feel like you're on track with that, all the ways you want to, please reach out, get some help. Whether I can help you myself directly as a coach, or I recommend someone else, or we find some other way. Don't settle for substandard. You deserve to have a masterpiece. Life. All right, now, today's guest, Kathy Lambert. An exceptional woman. You know, there are certain people in life when you meet them. You just know, like, I want to hang out with this person because when I do, I'm going up. I'm feeling better. Their positivity, their intelligence, their drive, their heart is contagious. And that is 100% the case with Kathy. Now she's a speaker and a coach, an entrepreneur, and she's been in the realm of social business. Social enterprise run nonprofits, help nonprofits. And she's got so much to share. And so before I say more, let's get her up here herself. Kathy, thank you so much for being with us.

Judith Kravitz:
Thank you so much for having me today, Daniel. I'm so excited to be here.

Daniel Aaron:
Oh it's great. I'm I'm I just love that you are with us. You've got so much, um, so much to share. And, you know, I said a little bit to our audience about who you are. Um, though, would you share a little bit, like, how did you how did you get to that? Because, you know, everybody says, yeah, I want to add good to the world. I want to do good to the world. But you write really like focused on this in big and in fact, effective and powerful ways for a long time. How did that come to be?

Judith Kravitz:
So it was, gosh, probably I don't know. Years ago, right? But over 25 years ago. And I was at the time really just searching for what God wanted to do with my life. And I had a business with a partner in corporate training. And before that I was in the corporate world and in health care. But on the business development side, and I just I knew I loved my business, but I knew that I was supposed to do something more, but I didn't know what that was. And so I took the time to just pray and to like to seek after what it was. Anybody that would talk to me, I would listen to them. I would pay attention to the mail that would come in. And actually, one day an article came, I'm in magazine and inside it was this article about dress for success. And I thought, oh, you know, it was I thought, this is maybe about the business I'm in, but instead it was about providing interview clothing to women that were transitioning back into the workforce, coming from difficult situations. And that just really touched my heart. And I thought this would be great to do someday. Someday when I have the time, someday when I don't have to make money. And I kept thinking, someday is when I want to do that. And what happened was the wildest thing. I put the magazine in my basement and I thought, Someday I'm going to do this. But I would wake up in the middle of the night thinking about this thing during the day. It was like somebody was having their hand on my back and pushing me towards it, and I thought, this is so crazy. I know nothing about a nonprofit. I don't I can't do this, and this is nuts. So I thought I would, I would stop it and show my husband, who at the time had was a civil engineer, and I thought, he'll think I'm crazy and that'll be the end. So I showed him the article and he read it, and he looked at me and he said, oh my gosh, you have got to do this. And I just looked at him and I thought, okay, if you tell me I have to do this, then I must really have to do this.

Judith Kravitz:
So short of a very long story, I hunted Nancy Loveland down, who was the founder of dress for success out of New York, and when I called her, she was so convincing and said, you've got to do this. And I said, well, I don't really know what I'm doing. And she said, you have got to do it. I'll help you. And so I hung up and I went to our church. I asked them if they would take this on as a mission and as a ministry, and I would help get it started, and then somebody else can take it over. Well, so for 23 years, I was I left what I was doing and, um, started dress. What started in Saint Louis is dress for success Midwest and um, and then my husband then soon within the first year left what he was doing. And as a civil engineer, he said, I feel like I need to do what you're doing. And when he I thought he's crazy because I didn't have any money at the time coming in. And he said, you keep talking about transportation and how something needs to be done. I researched, I found a transportation program, I'm going to model that. And I thought, okay, on nights, on weekends you can do that, but not during the day. Three days later, he quit his job and started a separate second nonprofit called wheels for success, where people donated cars. We refurbished them and award them to families that need transportation. And so we were doing that. And then we, um, in 2001, we merged our organizations together. Then we decided to really commit ourselves and our lives to breaking that generational cycle of poverty, of violence and incarceration. And we wanted to see that that cycle broken for that next generation, instead of keeping down, to be able to live the dreams that were inside of them. So, um, we start we then morphed into connections to success, and our mission and vision was all about breaking that generational cycle. And we ended up creating a holistic model called Pathways to Success that, um, actually, we have evidence, it's evidence based, and we have research behind it that actually does break that generational cycle.

Judith Kravitz:
And in 2014, we started replicating teaching others across the country. And then in 20 2021, during the pandemic, we actually started our process of succession in 2018. And then in 2021, we actually then made our transition and we have a new CEO. And um, and then honestly, Daniel, that's a whole nother story because I didn't know what was next after that. And then we started, um, that was a whole nother process of where do I go from here? Um, my whole life, my community, everything I always get emotional. Even talking about it was the people we served. And it took me a little time to unpack who I was. So through that unpacking became, um, our company that we now have today, which is Cable Impact Partners. And what I learned is that. All those years was really preparation of learning and not knowing what I was doing, but doing it anyway. And but learning the skills and developing a team to be able now to seed into other nonprofit leaders and other leaders who are doing social impact in the corporate world. Um, and. Being able to to help them and hopefully help them not take as long as it took me, but to be able to help them to make that difference in their and their organizations and their communities. And so that's that's what I'm doing now. So I did a long answer to your short question.

Daniel Aaron:
Well that's great. I love all that you said. It's super inspiring. And and I love I love that you're still so in touch with with the emotion that is connected to all of that for you and your question. Well, your response rather brings up for me about 400 other questions.

Judith Kravitz:
I know, I'm sure.

Daniel Aaron:
And the first one, though is I'm I'm super curious. Like, I'm curious about people and, and how they do what they do, and especially curious about people that can do what you did and the way I'll put it, reflect it back and see if this makes sense. Right. So you you're going through life and you're doing sort of the normal things like focused on, all right, I'm going to take care of myself, my family. And then and then something comes out of the blue. Right. And for you, it was this article. Right. And the and the article touches something in you. And then there's this feeling, this calling of. I want to do more, I need to do more. Right? Which is very much like what Joseph Campbell would talk about. And the hero's journey. Right? The call?

Judith Kravitz:
Exactly.

Daniel Aaron:
Then, so the two things that strike me about that is how for you, what facilitated what allowed you, what empowered you to one feel that right. Because and acknowledge it because I think most people well, I know most people go through their lives focused on what do I need to do for me. And even if they have like a flicker of an interest in, maybe I could do more for others. But mostly people are, you know, again, as Thoreau said, leading lives of quiet desperation or another way of saying it is they're they're just just going through the motions, taking care of themselves. But what was it in you that allowed you to say, I want to give more, I want to do more for others?

Judith Kravitz:
You know, I, I really for me, it was a spiritual process and it was really taking that time to, to pray, to, to really seek what I was supposed to. I just, I just, I don't know, I had this nine in me, this unsettledness that I knew that I was supposed to do something and I, I really in taking that time and I always feel like, you know, God of whoever people think you know what, God is a spirit is it? It comes upon you. It came upon me of I needed to do something. And the wild thing of it is, is that when I read that article, all of those things kept going in my mind of I don't know how to do this. I wouldn't be. Who am I to do this? I wouldn't be called to do this. And and it was just so overwhelming. And so I took a small step and said, okay, I'll do this, but only this much. And and then it was like, then I my heart got wrecked by the very first person I suited out of the trunk of my car, and I just, I thought, oh my gosh, I have to do this to see the difference that it made in her life. And I thought, I need, I need to do this. So I did that step. And then it's just like all along the way that there were different steps where my heart just kept getting wrecked, and I knew that I, I had to keep going. And then it just kept getting though bigger, if that makes sense. So, you know, working with with women coming out of poverty. And at first it was just providing a suit. And then I learned from them about the challenges. I didn't even know Daniel about poverty in my backyard. And when I heard their stories and and really being present, you know, I learned to be present and listen and to hear behind really what is even being said. And I could feel I could feel their pain, I could feel their hurt and the challenges that they faced with transportation, which I go out and get in my car and go, they can't do that.

Judith Kravitz:
And to hear about them taking a bus or there's no transportation. So you know that that may I just always call holy discontent of my gosh, our system. And so then it led me to think about, well, what's our welfare system like? And then I learned about that. And and learned how. Our system was keeping people down. And that that name came up enough. Well, who's doing something about this? And I couldn't I couldn't find anybody that was really doing something about helping people really break out of that system. And people touted of, oh, well, you know, there's been generations of people coming to this food bank and generations of people living in housing. And I'm thinking, wait. And I thought, I thought I was the weird one, actually, because I thought, what, what? This is this can't be right. And and I just wanted to help people to see that they didn't have to live this way. And I think that one of the biggest challenges that I saw is when the women would share with me. That they would begin disconnecting from their sons when they were 12 years old. And. And I didn't understand, and I. What? What do you mean? You just what what what do you disconnect from them? And then they shared with me specifically in the urban core. They said, Kathy, they're either going to be imprisoned for life or they're going to be dead by the time they're 21. And that hit my heart. Daniel and I kept thinking, we have got to do something to help families, to help individuals, to help that next generation to have a life. And it was all these steps along the way that, um, I feel like God just kept wrecking my heart. And then I didn't really know. I kept thinking, well, I don't know what to do. And but then I thought, I have to find out. And, you know, I would go to our state and I would get laughed at, you know, of, you know, I would have. I'll never forget this. I met with a director and of, um, one of the departments, and I just talked with him.

Judith Kravitz:
I said, I want to know who set up this system because it's crazy. And he just said, you know, well, it's a 100 year old system, you know, that's how it is. And he said, why, what do you think? And I sat there and I looked at him and I said, you know, I think there needs to be a holistic program. We need to have mentoring in place. We need to get the interfaith community involved. We need to have help people to have jobs and help them with education. We need to help holistically, right. Have a vibrant life. And and I said, well, how do you plan on doing this? I said, well, I said, we we need to start with helping to change our mindsets, helping to give them hope and opportunity and have mentors and be able to help them and walk alongside and do life together with them so they feel a sense of community. And I remember he looked at me and he said, you know what? I think you got something. He said, I would have laughed at you and laughed you out of this office a year ago and this was way back in, I don't know, 1999. That's a long time ago. And, um, and that actually led to the first funding that we had ever received that I had ever received and as a pilot project. And, um, and, you know, it's and then starting that work, then the next thing I knew, I was getting calls to go to prison, and I got a call from our state and asked if I would work with them, with, um, women coming out of prison. And I said, no, I, I have enough to do right here, because this was my little box that I was going to work in, and I thought the need was huge. And and this I know nothing about the prison system. And they kept calling. And so finally I said, okay, I'll, I, I, I will learn and but I said, what I want to do before I say yes is I want to go in to meet the women, and I need to go in and talk with them and, and hear from them.

Judith Kravitz:
So I went to prison and I remember walking in thinking, gosh, are the women going to what are they going to think of me? Are they going to be mean? Are they going to be, you know, I had these visions like of television, right? And when I went in. And this gets me all emotional again, but I sat and met with them. It was. Incredible. I listened to their dreams. They. They were just like me. By the grace of God, go I. And they wanted the most thing that they wanted is for their children not to repeat those same cycles. And when I walked out of that door, all I kept thinking about is what happens to them when they leave. What happens when they do walk out that door? Where do they go? What do they do? And I, I went back and I met with a local halfway house director and I asked her, I said, you know, I said, what happens when the women come here from prison? And she said, well, she said, Kathy, I throw them a phone book, tell them that they have to get a job within two weeks. They usually come with either their prison uniform on or what they were incarcerated in, she said. I they have to see they have to have a health exam in 72 hours. They have to go see their probation officer. She kept rattling everything off and I thought, whoa, like, how can they do that? And I kept thinking of these women. Some of them had done a lot of time away. How can they do this? And when I asked her that question. She looked at me and she said, they can't. She is that 86% of them asked me to send them back. They ask to go back. So, Daniel, there went that piercing on my heart again, and that I just felt like my heart was just kept getting stomped on and I just thought, oh, oh, oh, now we have to do something. So. I started that trajectory of prison and, um, then started working with, with the state working. And I went through some training that they asked me to participate with, with the National Institute of Corrections out of Washington.

Judith Kravitz:
And I did that, and my eyes just really got opened to this, to that system and how the community really needs to be a part of it and how we need to go inside and work pre-released, and we need to go in and then and work from the inside to the outside, and we need to activate our interfaith communities. We need to have mentoring. They need to know where they're going to live. They need to have a job. They need to have support. And it needs to to again be wrapped around. Right. And so as we were proceeding and I got connected, um. And got connected with somebody out of Washington, D.C. and shared the vision, and we applied for a grant. We were able to get a grant and, um, started then working in the prisons. And then I was asked to we were asked to go to Kansas City, and this time they said, but we want you to work with men. And I said, no, I know nothing about men. I can't do this. So you can see I have a pattern of no, no. And so kind of being resistant. Right. And um, so I, I, I then just prayed about it and my husband and I talked about it, we talked with our board and our board said we need to go. And I said, okay, we need to go. So we opened an office in Kansas City. And um, so we went in. We were we had to do some community building before we went. And I'll just share this quick little story with you. And I went in the prison, and that was actually in the city jail. And there was a gentleman that was going to head up our office there, and he went in with me. And when I walked in. I never felt so much fear in all my life. And there were like 100 guys on one side and they're orange jumpsuits. And on the other side there was about 100 guys. And then I walk and I could, I could just, I could feel the name calling. I could feel that I'm a white woman walking in.

Judith Kravitz:
I could, I could just I felt evil. And I looked at the gentleman that was with me and I said, you know what? I made a mistake. I we're not going to do this. I'm going to call Washington. Tell them we're done, and you go in, you talk to the guys. But and I saw there was an officer at the end of the hall with a desk. I said, I'm going to wait down there. And so at that time, that person started walking towards us. And as the person got closer, big, tall, like woman. And I looked at her and I just said, I'm, I'm not going to go in, we made a little mistake here. He's going to go in and talk to the guys and then we're gone. You'll never see us again. She goes, no, she goes, you're going in? I said, no, I'm not going in. I'm going to wait down at your desk. And she said, no. I mean, we argued Daniel back and forth and I was, I was scared, I honestly, I was scared to death. I'm thinking I am not going in there. Next thing I knew, she grabbed my arm. She grabbed my arm so tight and she turned me around. She unlocked the door. She took me in. She let go, and I was. I was frozen and you know, she went out and the door locked. And here I was with this other guy and all of these men. And I just all I kept thinking of was like, okay, this is the part of a speakers group. And they said, you know, put your hands down, look above the heads and stare into a corner. And I thought, okay, I gotta put my hands down on my side, stare at a corner and look at a corner and I just, I, I literally I just was praying and I just, I was just praying. I thought, God, you have got to get me out of here. And when I was started praying, there was this young man that came up about this far from my face. And he had long dreads, tattoos everywhere.

Judith Kravitz:
And he started yelling at me and he was yelling at me and saying, and I was I was trying to look above his head. I didn't want to look at him. Look at I was petrified. I mean, he was so close to me. And I just kept looking above his, his head. And he said, you. He said, you don't care about us. You just want us to send, just sign up so you can get money. And he screamed, you don't care. And when he said that. The corner that I was staring at. And I tell you, the honest to goodness truth. It was like lightning that came from that corner to the back of my head and I. I kind of like, look back. And I leaned forward. It was so wild. I leaned forward and I looked at him. Right. I said, you have kids, don't you? And his eyes got really big. And he said, yeah. And I said, you have six kids. And he started backing up and I looked around. I could see all these. It was wild. I could see all these kids. And I was asking them all and I said, oh, kids. They all started, you know, raising their hands. Yeah, yeah. And I said, I know I and I started counting like this and this. They all started backing away from me and I started moving closer. All of a sudden I felt braver. I started moving closer, and then I could see their dreams, and I could see where some of them wanted to be, like carpenters, artists, musicians, lawyers. I could see business owners, I could see their dreams. And I started talking with them about their dreams and how they can make a change. And I asked them, how many of you have been in here before? More than once they raise their hands. I said, you can stop this. You can stop this cycle. You can be the role model for your children so they don't repeat. And then the next thing I knew, they all came around. And we were talking.

Judith Kravitz:
And my fear. Went away that day. That day that fear was gone. And since that time, after that day, we had like 28 guys that signed up and the first guy that yelled at me, the long dreads. Today, he's an ironworker. His six kids, they're all they've gone on to school. Some of them started their own businesses. He's doing so well and doing great. And from that point after that, then I started going in and working, um, in the federal system, and I would go into Leavenworth and I didn't. The first time I went in for Leavenworth, I would go in for three days and work with guys that I'd never knew this, but they weren't getting out. And, um, and I worked with the heads of the blacks and the Crips and, um, it's it was just wild and, um, and helping them, those that were not getting out, helping them to change their mindsets, to help the guys that are getting out and helping them to find purpose in their life and helping them to see that they have value and that they have value for their families and that how to be connected. So from that whole thing, Daniel, I would go into prisons and as we grew as an organization, I just made sure I would go in at least every quarter to keep that passion, you know, going. And, um, and it's interesting, I was at an event, so I left the organization three years ago. I was at an event two nights ago, and at an event that we partner with one of the HBCUs here, Harris-stowe. And there was a gentleman that came up to me and I heard him speak. He was a part of a prison entrepreneur program. And so I talked with him and he said, hey, I did. I did 26 years in the federal system. And then I said, so where, where, where did you where were you? I said, I've gone into Leavenworth, I've gone into Terre Haute, I've gone into Greenville, Illinois, I've done a lot of these federal prisons. And he said, well, I was in Leavenworth. And so I said, well, I would go in three, you know, for three days, you know, once a quarter and for the certain program.

Judith Kravitz:
And he goes, oh, my gosh, Chaplain Hughes. I said, yeah, Chaplain Hughes, he got Chaplain Hughes on FaceTime right then and there. But it was. And he said that program changed my life, the one that he went through. But he said, I will come and sit in your program in the back because he said I wasn't eligible, but Chaplain Hughes would let me come in and sit in the back. And that for me was you never know what seeds we plant in our lives. And so that was just really pivotal. Just and that just happened a couple days ago. But I just thought I just never know. And it was just so, um, meaningful for me to have that happen. And I feel like I've talked way too much. I'm so sorry.

Daniel Aaron:
You have talked exactly the right amount, so thank you. And I'm so touched and inspired by all that you've shared. And so, um, I there are a couple things for me to highlight from what you said for our audience, because what you said is, is, you know, it's it's touching and inspiring and it's also relevant for everybody. Not everybody's going to do what you did, you know, whether it's right with the women that you have or in the prisons. However, I know well, my belief is firmly that everybody has a purpose, a mission, a unique destiny, a calling. Right. And that part of that, and this is especially true for the people that are interested in tuned in to this show. Right. Because tuned in here, the art of vibrant living want to have an extraordinary life. Well, one of the basic requirements of that is it's more than about just us. It's about something bigger.

Judith Kravitz:
It is. It is so much bigger than us. And I think the biggest thing is taking that time to realize that, taking that time to be quiet and to hear that small voice, um, to be able to take that time of. And that's one of the things that now that I, I feel so privileged to know of people that are doing so many amazing, incredible things and, and it can be anything. Right. But taking that time to know what it is that you're supposed to do and what is it that that nudge and how many times we're so busy that we don't hear it? It's there. We just don't hear it.

Daniel Aaron:
Yeah, well well said. And so a couple things that I noticed in your process. And again this is for people might some people might hear what you said like whoa Cathy. Like I could never do that. Right. You said no. You said no. You said no. You said no. Said no. But part of you said okay. And you use this phrase of several times, which is really curious for me. He said, my heart got wrecked. Right. Um, and I'm going to rephrase it and reflect it back to you and tell you if this still fits the experience you had. The way I hear you saying that is your heart got opened, that it got expanded, right? Yes. That you were touched. You had a moment or several moments where you connected with someone, you felt them, and that feeling opened your heart up. And what that did is opened you up to a greater level of compassion, of love. Right. And we know that when right, love is present, fear is absent, right? Yes. Love is going to eclipse the fear.

Judith Kravitz:
Yes, yes. And that's you're exactly right. And and I think what I've learned and you've so I love how you framed that and said that because it is so true. Because my heart just kept opening bigger and bigger and, and I would and I think that. And as you said, like for people listening to this, it's having your heart open that even when you're at the store, at the grocery store and being able to be open to just even smiling and, you know, just the checkout person thanking them and just being aware. And I think that's been my biggest thing of of really, really being aware and being present wherever I am, whatever I'm doing. And I think that's been one of my lessons that I've learned out of all of it. And. And when I feel like that thing of like, no, then I have to step back and think, okay, well, why? And what's going on with that? And, um, yeah, it's it's wild, I love it.

Daniel Aaron:
Well. And it's, you know, there are so many great mythological stories I think of. Part of my background is in is in yoga, and there's this amazing story from the Hindu tradition about the demigod Hanuman. And he, like, rises up to these incredible powers in the mythology. And it all happened because of his heart opening. Right. And what the story conveys, which is true for all of us, is that our our superpowers, our divinity, our destiny is activated through the opening of the heart, through feeling other. And, you know, and you had such so many powerful experiences of that. It's beautiful.

Judith Kravitz:
Well, and you know, what's interesting is, is when I transitioned because when I transitioned, I thought, am I done? Like, is this okay now what? And and in that the transition space. My what I learned also is that I had to really go into that space of my heart and not my head to try to figure things out and to really get into my heart and open. And I just I started like being open to all these other modalities. And so like Reiki and being able I went through Reiki, you know, certification and and then the next thing I knew from one of the nonprofits we worked with with horses, she asked me to go to um, communication workshop with with horses. I'd never been around horses in my life. And but I learned so much from that. And the healing, the healing that can come. And and it's been really beautiful, Daniel, with the process from what I did for 23 years and how transitioning, we're all in a transition and we all keep learning and growing. And I think that's what I've been learning is, is being able to be open to to what's next and open to all the possibilities that are around us all the time and seizing those opportunities. And instead of now saying no, I say yes.

Daniel Aaron:
Wow. Well that's beautiful I love that. And so that brings me back to another thing from your the chronology of your experience. Another pattern that I saw in there is you. Okay. You said no. You said no. You said no. But the calling was enough that the pull of your heart was enough, that you said yes to this. I'll go this far. I got my limitations. This is my boundary. I'll do this right. And and that's part of, I think, a great spiritual teaching for all of us is we don't need to know the whole plan. Right? You know, a car driving on the highway, a windy highway at night. The lights only see one curve ahead. That's all we need. And if we keep going, the lights are going to illuminate the rest of the path for us. Does that make sense?

Judith Kravitz:
That's it makes total sense. It's like just having, you know, like a lantern, you know, it's one step at a time, right, with your feet and and that's. You're exactly right. Yeah. Exactly. Right. We we just we have to take the step. Right? We have to take that step. If we don't take the step, we'll never know.

Daniel Aaron:
Yeah. So let's go back though, because this was such a fascinating story. Back to that moment when you were in the prison, right. The, the the big woman guard there. Yeah. Who who commanded you out of your fear? You know, like the way you told that story? I thought man guides, angels. Spirits come in so many different forms, right? Like that woman, she saw something in you that you didn't know you had. Right? And and her like forcefulness. I mean, if I was in your shoes, I would have been. I would have been freaking out. I would have peed my pants, for God's sake. I don't know, um, and but she was not taking no for an answer from you. No. And literally pushed you in. What? What do you think was going on for her? What? What happened in that moment?

Judith Kravitz:
So you really put a different perspective on than I ever thought of before. So thank you for sharing it, because I thought she was showing her power and control. Right. And at that time and at that moment I was furious with her. Mm. And, and then after everything had happened and just like what you're saying, I just thought what a blessing it was. And and really in the spiritual realm of things. I think you're exactly right. And it was. I was meant to be there. And if I wouldn't have done it, I would have missed out on that experience. I would have missed out on what was next. I was missed out on on all the other work that had to be done. And, um. That's. That's fascinating. Yeah.

Daniel Aaron:
Well. And because part of I mean, you didn't actually say this part, I felt it in what you were saying. But part of your experience as, as I understood it, is that right? And it's worth it to talk about that moment where you were staring at the corner, too. But but the experience in in that moment, in that room, in that cell. And then what transpired after that? Because because you did, you know, I don't know, submit to it going forward. Right. You you acquiesced. You surrendered to it. Um, then it sounds to me like there were so many beautiful things that happened in your life. And and what you contributed to others, of course, is, is amazing, though. Would you say there was also, um, reward or impact for your life through those experiences that came from that?

Judith Kravitz:
Oh my gosh. Yeah. I just have been so blessed. And that's really true. The saying is that you get so much out, more out when you give and you think you're giving, you get. So you get so much back. And I received so many gifts. And I think, you know, one of the big gifts is that my fear went away. Um, and, and what happened is I didn't see it's like, it's it's so hard to explain, but it's almost like I had shades on before, and those were ripped off, and I wouldn't see people and I this I do this today. I no longer saw people for where they were. I see what can be, um. And so when the prison and when I was in the jail, I didn't see that person as where they were. But I could see them for where they were, for who they really are and where they're going and what's to be. I mean, I could I can see that. And so it would be hard sometimes with because I'm a you can probably tell I'm a touchy feely, like I hug people like I love hugs and I hug. And so I had the presence. I'm like, I gotta hug these guys and I gotta hug the women, and you're not supposed to hug. And I would just say, I don't care. I'm a I got a hug. And and it's because I don't see them any different. And I see them as what can be and, and that's, that's one of the biggest gifts from that day moving forward. That was one of the biggest gifts that I've been given. And, um, to see the possibilities, to see where people's greatness and, and everyone has that in them. That's the thing. Everybody has that genius inside. They have it. They just need to let it come out.

Daniel Aaron:
Beautiful. I love that, and I mean, it's it's almost impossible for anyone to understand unless they've had the experience of beer dissolving. Right. Because we we all are so programed into living with fear and. Right. It's not a bad thing. And there is the, the human animal survival part of us that that, you know, fear has its place, right. It's just that in our modern world, it's place has gotten way bigger than it really needs to be. It's not likely that a Tyrannosaurus is going to jump out and eat us. We get fear about all these things that we don't need it for, right? So the the, the experience you had of fear releasing and being able to see the potential in people to see their glory, that that's just a phenomenal gift. And what it reminds me of is in the Buddhist tradition, there's something called the vow of the bodhisattva, right? And the bodhisattva is is the one who's achieved, achieved awakening and is free of their suffering. But they don't they don't go for the ultimate release from the cycles of the earthly, you know, good and bad Yeah they stay because they know that nobody is free until we are all free. Right? And it sounds to me like this is the experience that you've had is is like the, the filters, the veils have dissolved from around you so that you, your heart is open. So you want to help, your heart is open. So you see what is possible for others and to, to, to to embody that is a gift because it's automatically feeding that back to people. Does that make sense? Yeah, it.

Judith Kravitz:
Makes perfect sense and I love that. And yeah it's not something that I consciously do. And it's just it just happens and it's just it's just there and um, and it's it's just I just just I'm just so grateful and grateful for all the experiences and where I've, where I've been and what I've done. And, um, I just want to keep on giving.

Daniel Aaron:
Well, so thank you. And I guess that brings me to this again, so many things to ask you about and so little time. It's flying by. What? What now? Right. Like where you've had these, um, amazing, uh, trajectory of stepping to greater and greater challenges, expanding your heart and your giving to greater and greater degrees. And now you've had these transitions recently. What's alive for you now? And where are things going?

Judith Kravitz:
So what? Um, so as I was and some people would tell me that I was in a tunnel for 23 years, and I probably was. And so what I've had the blessing now of really seeing and learning from other leaders of what they're doing in the communities and other, you know, companies and organizations. And I'm helping with coaching and training and what I love. And the gift is there's so much good that is happening. And I didn't see that. And I love to be able to help make those connections happen. And then for the for leaders and what I'm doing is coaching and and really, you know, Daniel, it's just really leading with that curiosity and with that mind of curiosity and helping them to step into their greatness and helping them to see that what their gifts, their talents, their what they find that they know inside of them, but to help them, to bring it out, to even do greater good and what they're doing and let their light shine. And, um, and so that's, that's what I'm doing. I just, I love, I love where I am now, I love working with. And it's like I keep, you know, all these things somehow just keep coming. And so it's always I feel like I'm just learning and growing. But knowing that we all have this space and with being able to, I just imagine that, um, so I just, I, I follow James Twyman and reading and I just think about, like, even now in our world with peace and how beautiful if we all gathered and prayed and what a difference that that can make and that vibrational, as you mentioned at the beginning of your show, it's so important for us all to know and to know how we're all connected. And that, I feel like is one of my missions now, is to help people to to. To see how we're all connected and what that difference and what that that vibrant living and living on that higher level of what that can do for everyone. And, um, it's exciting. I never really, you know. No, I always say I never know what's going to happen. And, um, but I'm just open and and I just, I love the journey that I'm on right now that.

Daniel Aaron:
That's beautiful. I love it. And you pointed something out. Something that that has been a relatively recent discovery for me in the last few years, like so I've been I've been coaching and teaching for almost 30 years now. And I'd say at least the first half of that time, I really conceived of that work as teaching people things, and in some ways getting them to do things, getting them to commit to things. And nothing wrong with those pieces. Those can be really valuable, right? But more and more, though, I see that as my work evolves and as my effectiveness with clients evolves, it's become much more about loving and encouraging. And as you said, reflecting back to them their their glory, their uniqueness. And and I noticed now and I'm curious for your experience on this. I noticed now that as I've gotten better and better at seeing people's perfection and their potential, and when I feed that back to them, people just like they grow. And yes, so many of us are starved for for that, you know, we're just so beat up, used to thinking of ourselves in small ways and as ways that are flawed, yet, you know, so then to be able to feed that back to people, it's just so powerful. Is that part of what your experience is?

Judith Kravitz:
Yes, absolutely. And, you know, part of it is to, you know, many, many years ago, you know, that was it was I feel like that I had that imposter syndrome. And just sometimes, you know, even now it creeps back in. Um, and one of the things that I do every day, so I, you know, I, I have a, like a practice every day that I do and, you know, I meditate, I work, you know, I exercise, but I meditate, I make my prayer time and I and I have, I have like my vision board and I have I start off with gratitude and being grateful. And then I have my affirmations and with my vision board and the affirmations. And that's one of the things that you just mentioned. It is that when you reflect back to people and when they can see and feel who they really are and they and when they get it and you see them just, like, explode, right? It's just like they blossom. It's so beautiful. And what I've realized most people, and I think you said this earlier in the show, go through life. And they never discover that. They never discover that. And so the individuals that I was working with, with over 23 years and serving, it's now, I feel like in some ways I'm doing the same thing and helping people to let their light shine and helping to bring that out of them and helping them to live the life that they were called to live. And, you know, I think it's life is that journey and process. And, um, I love doing I love doing life together. And that's to me, that's what it's about.

Daniel Aaron:
Hallelujah, I love that. And so I'm going to pause and say something just very directly to, uh, the, our audience, you know, whether you're live with us or by rebroadcast, if you don't have the experience on a regular basis in your life of somebody like Cathy or somebody like me who is able to look you in the eye and feel your heart and say, you're amazing in all these all these ways, not just like, yeah, everybody's good and everybody's worthy of God's. No, I mean, like you individually, you have uniqueness. If you don't have that in your life, get it like you need to have that. And, you know, if you if you're not in a place where you can afford to hire a coach, then find a way to create that with peers because everybody benefits from that, not just you. All the people that you come in contact with benefit from that. The world benefits from that. So on that note, Cathy, I know that you have very generously offered a gift to our audience. Yes. Do you want to say what that is?

Judith Kravitz:
Yes, absolutely. I would love to give a 30 minute pro bono coaching session to whoever is interested. I would absolutely love to do that. They just need to follow up with me. They can. You can send me an email at Cathy at KBL Impact partners.com. And you can find me on LinkedIn too. So.

Daniel Aaron:
Yeah, well, that's such a generous gift. I mean, anybody tuned into this show knows now what an extraordinary being you are. And just to be with you would be a gift yet to also benefit from your experience in leadership and coaching. So I'll just say that back to make sure people have that email, Cathy, directly to take advantage of that. It's Cathy at k b l like the letters. Uh, what would that be? Kilo Bravo Lima. And then the word impact partners. Um, in fact, I see that on our screen. It's spelled wrong. So Impact Partners is not, um, that oh, it should be a P there, but impact label. Impact partners.com. So what a beautiful gift. Thank you Cathy. And you said um, people can find you on LinkedIn. Where else what's the best way for people to be in touch with you?

Judith Kravitz:
So I think you know, my email, LinkedIn, Facebook. So all of those different ways, um, are great. And um, that's usually the best way to, to reach out to me.

Daniel Aaron:
Awesome, awesome.

Judith Kravitz:
And our website, we have a website I forgot about, our website. We have our website. It's Kbll Impact partners.com. And that's also a great way.

Daniel Aaron:
Yeah. Thank you. Awesome. Okay. Um, and now we got in a moment. The big final question before that though. Is there anything that I haven't. Yeah. Is there anything that I haven't asked you or anything that you would like to share that hasn't come up so far in our last time together here?

Judith Kravitz:
I can't believe it's gone so fast. Um, you know what? I don't think so. I think that we, you know, I'm trying to think if there's anything else that I want to share. I just think that just what you had shared, too, is that just really encourage people that if you don't have someone that can really work with you. Because I've had coaches all throughout my whole journey and I, I, I can't imagine not having one and um, and mentors all along the way that have helped me and doing that life together and having people around you to encourage you, to support you, um, so valuable. So that's just I really, just really find that valuable. And I didn't really recognize that either until I started all this journey.

Daniel Aaron:
Yeah, I'm totally with you. And it's. I've been lucky because I stumbled into that early in my life. I just realized, like, hey, that person knows something. That person has something. I want to hang out with them. Yeah. You know, even before I even formalized it to, oh, I have a mentor or a coach, I just somehow intuited that. And I've always had that as part of my life. And it's been, you know, every level of success that I've had is attributable to that kind of support and reflection. So I'm totally with you on that.

Judith Kravitz:
Yeah. It's so important. Really important.

Daniel Aaron:
All right. Well then let's go to the big final question. Is it okay?

Judith Kravitz:
It's okay. I feel like I should have a drum roll. I don't know what you're going to ask.

Daniel Aaron:
Drum roll. So and the question is, it's, uh. It's an impossible question. It's so big, there's no way you could answer it because you've got so much experience. You've you've learned so much. You've created and given so much in your life. Now, all that said, if you had to boil it down and to share one thing, one piece of information, idea, concept, whatever, one thing with our audience that will help them to live a vibrant, thriving life. What's the one thing you would share?

Judith Kravitz:
Well, I think that I would share is to take that time every single day. Start off, maybe it's two minutes and sit and to meditate and you may hear, like you, you have this chatter going on. It's okay, just stick with it. And pretty soon those two minutes will be five minutes. Stick with it. Pretty soon it'll be 15, and that 15 20 minutes a day will make a huge impact in your life and you'll be able to quiet your mind, be able to hear from the from your spirit, from God, from the universe, and that is that voice inside. And it may not be an actual voice, but it may be a nudge and act upon it, listen. Feel it and act on it. And when that becomes a part of your life, and also with gratitude, your life will begin to change in ways you never dreamed or thought of.

Daniel Aaron:
That is beautiful. And and I really took note of you spoke a little bit earlier about your morning routine. And that's a massive, massively important part of my life. My own, uh, rituals, morning routine and something that I worked very closely with clients and students on as well. So I 100% concur. And we could talk for hours alone about that. I love that that's what you shared though, and completely with you. It's foundational, so important, so valuable. So all that said, uh, sadly, our time comes to an end. It's been such a pleasure and honor to be with you, Kathy, and not, you know, I appreciate you taking the time and sharing all that you have here. And even better, though, for all the work you've done and the courage and heart that you've shown over and over again in your life and career so far, um, to to become somebody who's so, um, rich in the heart and so, so valuable in the world, to share all of that with us. It's really a great gift. So thank you.

Judith Kravitz:
Thank you, thank you so much for having me. And I can't wait to come back to visit my friend Sandy and Hawaii. So then I can see you and meet you in person.

Daniel Aaron:
Absolutely. I so look forward to that. Yeah, I.

Judith Kravitz:
Love that too. Thank you so much for having me, Daniel.

Daniel Aaron:
An honor and a pleasure. Thank you. And y'all in our audience. Thank you. Because you are the real heroes here. It's you who's tuning in to raise the quality of your vibration, your life, so that you contribute more to the world so that you are thriving better. I love that you have the courage and commitment to to tune in here and my employment to you. My request to you. My encouragement is to don't just take in this wisdom from Kathy, actually take at least one thing and say, yeah, I'm going to apply that. I'm going to do something with that. I'm going to take one of those gold nuggets. There are so many. I'm going to apply that in my life, and I'm going to make my life even more vibrant. Because you're doing that. It makes a difference in the world. It changes the world. So I'm super grateful to you for being here with us, spending this time with us. Thank you. Please continue to make your life a masterpiece. Tune in again with us soon. Visit the show web page. The Art of Vibrant Living Show.com. See who's coming up. Watch past shows and I will see you soon. Thanks, y'all. Aloha! Mahalo for tuning in to the Art of Vibrant Living show, y'all! I'm Daniel Aaron and may you live with great vibrancy.

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